FANDOM


IMG 0933
IMG 7796

Al Kooper Family Tree

Blues Project

1967

July 22-26, 1967 140 Waverly Place, New York City, NY (Rehearsals at Al Kooper's apartment. The Blues Project and Bob Dylan's former organ player Al Kooper (b. Alan Peter Kuperschmidt, Saturday, February 5, 1944, at 12:15pm, Brooklyn, NY) had decided to move to England and chose to throw a “benefit” for himself at the New York's Cafe Au Go Go, because he needed to raise money for a one-way ticket to London to start a solo career. He also decided to get a pickup band together for the upcoming gigs and bring in Steve Katz (guitar, vocals, harp; b. Wednesday, May 9, 1945, at 3:00am, Brooklyn, NY) formerly of The Blues Project, Robert Wayne 'Bobby' Colomby (drums, vocals; b. Wednesday, December 20, 1944, New York City, NY) formerly of Odetta, Eric Andersen, and Children Of Paradise, and Jim 'Jimmy' Fielder (bass; b. James Thomas Fielder, Saturday, October 4, 1947, Denton, TX) formerly of Tim Buckley, Buffalo Springfield, and The Mothers Of Invention. They worked up most of the new material Al had written, plus some old “hits” of The Blues Project.

AL KOOPER'S LIVE BACKING BAND (JULY 22, 1967 - AUGUST 1967) 1) Al Kooper vocals, guitar, organ 2) Steve Katz vocals, guitar, harp 3) Bobby Colomby vocals, drums 4) Jimmy Fielder bass

July 27-29, 1967 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY ('Al Kooper’s Last U.S. Appearance,. Two shows a day. Also on the bill: Jack Adrews (27), plus many other guest artists. According to Al Kooper, his old pals Judy Collins, Eric Andersen and Paul Simon were to do a set on the first night, but none of them actually showed up)

Sunday, July 30, 1967 Al Kooper makes very little money from the “benefit” gigs due to excessive expenses, and gives up the idea of moving to London. Nonetheless, his pickup band sounds great, so he, Steve, Bobby and Jimmy decide to form a “real” band where they would add horns, like Al wanted to do since his last days with The Blues Project.

August 1967 Al, Steve, Bobby and Jimmy began their search for the horn section and the first addition to their as-yet unnamed new band was Colomby’s friend Frederick 'Freddie' Lipsius (b. Friday, November 19, 1943, New York City, NY) on alto sax and piano (he was also a music arranger). Lipsius was a music major who has studied classical music in New York and at Boston’s Berklee School of Music, before joining a Canadian big band.

UNNAMED REHEARSAL BAND (AUGUST 1967 - SEPTEMBER 1967) 1) Al Kooper 2) Steve Katz 3) Bobby Colomby 4) Jimmy Fielder 5) Freddie Lipsius alto sax, piano

September 1967 Regent Sound Studio’s Inc., New York City, NY Al Kooper took only Bobby Colomby and Jimmy Fielder into Regent Sound to cut three demos for his publishing company 'Sea-Lark Music'. They would be used to shop the as-yet unnamed new band. Al hired two studio trumpet players and overdubbed them to sound like four. They recorded: "I Can’t Quit Her", "My Days Are Numbered", and the Al Kooper-Tony Powers collaboration "I Need To Fly")

September 1967 Suggested by Al, the unnamed band become Blood, Sweat and Tears. According to Al, he finds the inspiration for the group’s name after an eventful all night jam session at the Cafe Au Go Go with Jimi Hendrix and B.B. King.

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #1 (SEPTEMBER 1967 - OCTOBER 1967) 1) Al Kooper 2) Steve Katz 3) Bobby Colomby 4) Jimmy Fielder 5) Freddie Lipsius

September 16, 1967 Village Theatre, New York City, NY (supported by James Cotton Blues Band)

October 1967 Blood, Sweat and Tears complete their horn section with the addition of Richard 'Dick' Halligan (trombone, organ, vocals, flute; b. Sunday, August 29, 1943, Troy, NY), a former Master of Arts graduate from the Manhattan School of Music, Randal Edward 'Randy' Brecker (trumpet, flugelhorn; b. Tuesday, November 27, 1945, Philadelphia, PA) formerly of the Randy Brecker Quartet, and Jerry Weiss (trumpet, flugelhorn; b. Wednesday, May 1, 1946, New York City, NY) formerly of Larry Elgart. The new eight piece lineup rehearsed together for the first time in the afternoon at the Cafe Au Go Go.

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #2 (OCTOBER 1967 - APRIL 14, 1968) 1) Al Kooper 2) Steve Katz 3) Bobby Colomby 4) Jimmy Fielder 5) Freddie Lipsius 6) Dick Halligan trombone, keyboards, vocals, flute 7) Randy Brecker trumpet, flugelhorn 8) Jerry Weiss trumpet, flugelhorn

November 11, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Blood, Sweat and Tears entered Columbia Studio for their first recording session, a six songs demo for Columbia Records. They recorded (one take each) an instrumental, Kooper’s "Refugee From Yuhupitz", along with "Morning Glory", "So Much Love", "Just One Smile", "My Days Are Numbered" and one other unknown song. Produced by John Simon)

November 16, 1967 Blood, Sweat and Tears signed for Columbia Records.

November 17-19, 1967 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (with Moby Grape & (MC) Larry Hankin. Blood, Sweat and Tears’ debut gigs with their new horn section)

November 19-26, 1967 The Scene, New York City, NY ('Thanksgiving Blues Jam', supported by The Chambers Brothers, John-John McDuffy, The Soul Purpose, Sam Lay and The Mojo Men (cancelled), Tiny Tim (MC))

November 21-26, 1967 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (cancelled, "The Blues Bag", with Butterfield Blues Band, James Cotton Blues Band, Richie Havens, Dave Van Ronk (cancelled), Odetta (cancelled), Larry Hankin (MC), and others). Al Kooper & Steve Katz were advertised but were in fact simply part of Blood, Sweat and Tears. Blood, Sweat and Tears cancelled because they were already booked to play at Steve Paul’s The Scene that same week)

December 11, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Blood, Sweat and Tears first official Columbia recording session. The band was there to start recording their debut album, 'Child Is Father To The Man', produced by John Simon. That day the band recorded just one song, 'Overture', composed by Al Kooper)

December 12, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, recording "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" composed by ​Al Kooper, Harry Nilsson's "Without Her" & Tim Buckley's "Morning Glory")

December 12-17, 1967 Whisky a Go Go, West Hollywood, CA (cancelled at last minute because that same week they were in the studio full of work for the recording of their debut album. Steppenwolf (12-14), Topanga Canyon (12-13), Sweetwater (12-17), and Big Brother and The Holding Company (15-16) replaced them)

December 13, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, recording "My Days Are Numbered" composed by Al Kooper)

December 15, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, recording Randy Newman's "Just One Smile", Carole King and Gerry Goffin's "So Much Love/Underture", & "Meagan's Gypsy Eyes" composed by Steve Katz)

December 16, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, recording "I Can't Quit Her", composed by Al Kooper and Irwin Levine & "House In The Country" composed by Al Kooper)

December 20, 1967 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, recording "Somethin' Goin' On" & "The Modern Adventures Of Plato, Diogenes and Freud" both composed by Al Kooper (the latter was actually recorded only by Kooper plus a string section). This was the last recording session of their debut album)

December 29-31, 1967 The Scene, New York City, NY ('Holiday Blues Rock Festival', with Influence, Bruce Scott With The Head Set & (MC) Tiny Tim)

1968

​January 25-February 18, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (with James Cotton (25-4), H.P. Lovecraft (14-16; they were scheduled to appear also on 17-18 but cancelled because of a payment controversy between them and Cafe Au Go Go’s owner Howard Solomon) ​ ​February 23-24, 1968 Psychedelic Supermarket, Boston, MA (with Big Brother and The Holding Company)

February 2?, 1968 Northfield School for Girls, East Northfield, MA Supposedly this show happened around the same time of the above shows at the Psychedelic Supermarket.

March 3, 1968 Grande Ballroom, Detroit, MI (supported by Carousel & Psychedelic Stooges)

March 5, 1968 Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO (cancelled at the last minute because Al Kooper had lost his voice, and Columbia Records wanted him in shape for the more important San Francisco and Los Angeles dates)

March 7, 1968 Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA (supporting Cream, James Cotton & Jeremy & The Satyrs)

March 8-10, 1968 Winterland, San Francisco, CA (supporting Cream, James Cotton & Jeremy & The Satyrs)

March 9, 1968 WEWS Television Studios, Cleveland, OH (broadcast date. US TV "Upbeat" for WEWS Channel 5. Typically the show would be rehearsed from about 9am until noon, then come back after lunch at 1pm to do the taping. It would take two a couple of hours to tape the one-hour show. Also appearing on this episode were, The Blues Project, Canned Heat, Bubble Gum Machine, Georgie Fame, The Four Freshmen, The Four Sonics, Bobby Goldsboro, Mortimer’s Tree Boys, The Racket Squad, The Short Kuts, The American Breed, The GTO’s, Debbie Taylor & The Union Gap) ​ March 11-13, 1968 Whisky A Go Go, West Hollywood, CA

March 15-17, 1968 Avalon Ballroom, San Francisco, CA (supported by John Handy & Son House)

March 26, 1968 Electric Circus, New York City, NY (with Judy Collins, Taj Mahal & Elephant’s Memory)

March 28, 1968 Electric Circus, New York City, NY (B,S&T cancelled?, with United States of America, The Stone Poneys, Jimmy Collier & Rev. Kirkpatrick)

March 28-31, 1968 La Cave, Cleveland, OH

April 2-7, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY

​April 6, 1968 WEWS Television Studios, Cleveland, OH (broadcast date. US TV "Upbeat" for WEWS Channel 5. Typically the show would be rehearsed from about 9am until noon, then come back after lunch at 1pm to do the taping. It would take two a couple of hours to tape the one-hour show. Also appearing on this episode were, Wayne Cochran and The C.C. Riders, Vic Dana, Hassles, Al Hirt, Mortimer’s Three Boys, The Robbs, Bob Shane, Bobby Vee, Bubble Gum Machine, Georgie Fame & The American Breed)

April 11-14, 1968 Garrick Teatre, upstairs the Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (Al Kooper, Randy Brecker and Jerry Weiss’ last gigs with Blood, Sweat and Tears. Al leaves the band right after the last Sunday night show due to creative differences, while Jerry and Randy both leave the band a few weeks later)

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #3 (APRIL 15, 1968 - JUNE ?, 1968) 1) Steve Katz 2) Bobby Colomby 3) Jimmy Fielder 4) Freddie Lipsius 5) Dick Halligan 6) Randy Brecker 7) Jerry Weiss

April 19-21, 1968 Electric Factory, Philadelphia, PA (Cancelled at last minute because Al Kooper had left the band just a few days earlier and they had not yet found a replacement. With Edison Electric Band)

June ?, 1968 After Randy Brecker and Jerry Weiss leave Blood, Sweat and Tears following in the footsteps of Al Kooper (Randy joined Horace Silver's Quintet before forming Dreams the following year (he will soon become one of the top session players of the 70s and also forms a successful partenership with his brother Michael Brecker), while Jerry moved onto bass guitar and recorded an album in 1970 with his new outfit, Ambergris), the band had lost three members in a row, so they decided to take a break for a couple of months, just to try to find the right replacements. Finally, they find Charles 'Chuck' Winfield (trumpet; b. Friday, February 5, 1943, Monessen, PA), a former student of New York’s renowed Julliard School of Music, Lewis Michael 'Lew' Soloff (trumpet; b. Tuesday, February 22, 1944, Brooklyn, NY - d. Sunday, March 8, 2015, just before 1:00am, New York City, after suffered a massive heart attack) formerly of the Gil Evans Orchestra and a former student of New York's nenowed Julliard School of Music, Jerry Hyman (trombone; b. Monday, May 19, 1947, New York City, NY), and David Clayton-Thomas (lead vocals; b. David Henry Thomsett, Saturday, September 13, 1941, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, UK) formerly of The Shays, The Rogues, and The Bossmen. David Clayton-Thomas was hired after Stephen Stills turned down the offer and after Laura Nyro rehearsed with them one day but it didn’t work out because she had a too strong personality and they would have been her back-up band. ​ Line-Up #4 (JUNE ?, 1968 - FEBRUARY 1971) 1) Steve Katz 2) Bobby Colomby 3) Jimmy Fielder 4) Freddie Lipsius 5) Dick Halligan 6) Chuck Winfield - trumpet 7) Lew Soloff - trumpet 8) Jerry Hyman - trombone 9) David Clayton-Thomas - lead vocals

June 18-July 7, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (with James Cotton (28-29). The new nine piece line-up of Blood, Sweat and Tears perform for the first time together at the Cafe Au Go Go.

July 14, 1968 Thee Image, Miami, FL (with Blues Image) ​ July 18, 1968 Rhode Island Auditorium, Providence, RI ('Pop Music Festival', with The Who)

July 25, 1968 Americana Hotel or El San Juan Hotel, San Juan, PR ('Columbia Records Annual Sales Convention'. A dinner show that also featured Big Brother and The Holding Company, another of Columbia’s top recording artists)

July 26-27, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY

August 2-4, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY (with Buzzy Linhart)

August 9-11, 1968 Fillmore West, San Francisco, CA (supporting Eric Burdon & The Animals, with Gypsy Wizard Band)

August 16-18, 1968 Cheetah, Santa Monica, CA (supported by Barry Goldberg Reunion & Eastside Kids)

August 23-25, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY

August 26-29, 1968 The Scene, New York City, NY (with Chambers Brothers, The McCoys, and many surprise guests, like Jimi Hendrix that appeared during one or more of the last three nights)

September 6-7, 1968 Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, NY

September 12, 1968 The Scene, New York City, NY ('Biafra Benefits')

September 13-14, 1968 Fillmore East, New York City, NY (2 shows each night, with Amboy Dukes & Chambers Brothers)

September 20-21, 1968 Rock Pile, Toronto, ON (with Transfusion)

September 27-29, 1968 Renaissance Club, Camden, NJ

October 1, 1968 Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO

October 4, 1968 Public Auditorium, Cleveland, OH (with Big Brother and The Holding Company)

Otober 5, 1968 The Inferno, Harry Altman’s Glen Park Casino and Amusement Park, Buffalo, NY (cancelled due to a fire on September 23rd)

​October 7-9, 1968 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, Blood, Sweat and Tears begin recording their second album produced by James William 'Jim' Guercio. They recorded (7th) Billie Holiday's "God Bless The Child" (8th) "Sometimes In Winter", composed by Steve Katz (9th) "Spinning Wheel", composed by David Clayton-Thomas & "Variations on a Theme By Erik Satie (1st and 2nd Movements)", arranged by Dick Halligan)

October 11-12, 1968 Psychedelic Supermarket, Boston, MA (with The Tom Swift Electric Band)

October 15-16, 1968 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, (15th) Little Milton's "More and More" & Traffic's "Smiling Phases" (16th) Brenda Holloway's "You've Made Me So Verry Happy")

October 19, 1968 Clark University, Worcester, MA (suported by Olatunji) ​ October 22, 1968 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, Laura Nyro's "And When I Die" & their own "Blues - Part II", a song that interpolated Cream's 'Sunshine Of Your Love', Willie Dixon's Spoonful', and Al Kooper's 'Somethin' Goin' On' from their debut album)

October 23, 1968 State University of New York Gymnasium, Stony Brook, NY (with Ten Years After, Rhinoceros & Soft White Underbelly) ​ October 24, 1968 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (Recording Sessions, "Child Of The Wind", composed by David Clayton-Thomas. The song should have been included on their second eponymous album, but finally remained unreleased) ​ October 25, 1968 Fordham University Gymnasium, Bronx, NY (with Chambers Brothers)

November 8, 1968 Hunter College Auditorium, New York City, NY (with Joni Mitchell)

November 9, 1968 Kenyon College Wertheimer Fieldhouse, Gambier, OH

November 14, 1968 Yale University, New Haven, CT

November 16, 1968 Rider College, Lawrenceville, NJ

November 2?, 1968 Kaleidoscope, Philadelphia, PA (with Rhinoceros)

November 26-30, 1968 Laurel Theatre, Chicago, IL (29th & 30th were cancelled)

November 29, 1968 Grande Ballroom, Detroit, MI (supported by The Stuart Avery Assemblage)

November 30, 1968 Grande, Cleveland, OH (supported by The Stooges)

December 8, 1968 Tyrone Guthrie Theatre, Minneapolis, MN

December 20, 1968 Hunter College Auditorium, New York City, NY

December 27, 1968 Westchester County Center, White Plains, NY (with Earth Opera & Brooklyn Bridge)

December 31, 1968 Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Phoenix, AZ (with Steppenwolf, Three Dog Night & Illinois Speed Press)

? 1968 Gibber Hotel, Kiamesha Lake, NY

1969

January 2-4, 1969 Fillmore West, San Francisco, CA (supporting the Grateful Dead, with Spirit)

January 7-12, 1969 Troubadour Club, West Hollywood, CA (Supported by Gordon Alexander)

January 17, 1969 Franklin County Veterans Memorial, Columbus, OH

January 18, 1969 Civic Arena, Pittsburgh, PA (supported by Hello People)

January 24-25, 1969 Fillmore East, New York City, NY (2 shows supported by Jethro Tull & The Gay Desperados, who filled in for the Savoy Brown Blues Band)

January 26, 1969 Alexandria Roller Rink, Alexandria, VA (supported by Spirit)

January 31, 1969 Civic Center, Baltimore, MD ('Baltimore Rock Festival', with Spirit, Nazz, Rhinoceros & Mother Earth)

February 10, 1969 Memphis, TN (with The Guess Who)

February 15, 1969 Lisner Auditorium, Washington DC (with David Frye)

February 16, 1969 Ed Sullivan Theater, New York City, NY (broadcast date, US TV "The Ed Sullivan Show" performing "Smiling Phases". Also appearing were Rodney Dangerfield, Arthur Godfrey, Caterina Valente, The Young Americans, Eric Brenn, Fiore & Eldridge & The Rios Brothers)

February 19, 1969 Franklin County Veterans Memorial, Columbus, OH

February 21-22, 1969 Kinetic Playground, Chicago, IL (supported by Savoy Brown Blues Band & Aorta (who rellaced Mother Earth). BS&T replaced headliner The Jeff Beck Group after the latter postponed their US tour, on the 21st). Comedian Bill Cosby, who was represented by the same Los Angeles’ business manager of Blood, Sweat and Tears, paid a visit to them at the Kinetic Playground one night, and grabbed a tambourine and sat in with BS&T’s rhythm section)

February 23, 1969 Electric Factory, Philadelphia, PA (Supported by Sweet Stavin Chain) ​ February 27-28, 1969 Electric Factory, Philadelphia, PA (Supported by Lothar and The Hand People) ​ March 1, 1969 Island Garden Arena, West Hempstead, NY (supported by Procol Harum)

March 8, 1969 SUNY Gymnasium, Stony Brook, NY (supported by Mountain & Jolliver Arkasans) ​ March 19, 1969 War Memorial Auditorium, Fort Lauderdale, FL (2 shows 7.30 & 9.30, supported by Bunky & Jake)

March 20, 1969 Miami Beach Municipal Auditorium, Miami Beach, FL (2 shows 7.30 & 9.30, supported by Bunky & Jake)

March 22, 1969 Drew University Baldwin Gymnasium, Madison, NJ (2 shows 7.00 & 10.20, supported by Chuck Berry & Rhinoceros)

March 25, 1969 The Ballroom, Stratford, CT

March 28-29, 1969 Kinetic Playground, Chicago, IL (supported by Pacific Gas & Electric)

March 30, 1969 Ford Auditorium, Detroit, MI (2 shows 3.00 & 7.30, Supported by The Rationals & Rare Earth, who replaced The Sunday Funnies)

April 3, 1969 Westchester County Center, White Plains, NY (with Rhinoceros & Ten Years After)

April 11-12, 1969 Fillmore East, New York City, NY (2 shows each day with Aum, (11th) Albert King, (11th) Jethro Tull & (12th) Savoy Brown)

April 13, 1969 Westbury Music Fair, Westbury, NY (2 shows 3.00 & 8.30)

May 10, 1969 Syria Mosque, Pittsburgh, PA

​June 22, 1969 Varsity Stadium, Toronto, ON ('Toronto Pop Festival 69', with Nucleus, Dr. John 'The Night Tripper', Charlebois & Steppenwolf) ​ June 27, 1969 Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, MD

June 28, 1969 Memorial Stadium, Mount Vernon, NY (supported by The Brooklyn Bridge)

July 4, 1969 Festival Field, Newport, RI ('16th Annual Newport Folk Festival', with Jethro Tull, The Jeff Beck Group, Ten Years After, Roland Kirk Quartet & Steve Marcus. Lights by Joshua Light Show. The Friday night show, billed as 'An Evening of Jazz-Rock', start at 8:00pm and attendance was a record-breaking 24,000. Each groups had 50 minute sets. The festival was organized by George T. Wein)

July 5, 1969 Atlanta International Raceway, Hampton, GA ('1st Annual Atlanta International Pop Festival', with Ten Wheel Drive, Staple Singers, Tommy James & The Shondells, Booker T. & The M.G.’s, Sweetwater, Delaney, Bonnie & Friends, Spirit, Pacific, Gas & Electric, Chicago Transit Authority, Joe Cocker, Led Zeppelin & Janis Joplin)

July 9, 1969 Central Park Wollman Memorial Skating Rink, New York City, NY ('2nd Annual The Schaefer Music Festival', supported by Carolyn Hester)

July 12, 1969 Spectrum, Philadelphia, PA (2.30 show supported by Edwin Hawkins Singers)

July 17, 1969 HemisFair Arena, San Antonio, TX (supported by Homer, Denny Ezba and The Gold)

July 19, 1969 University of Texas Gregory Gymnasium, Austin, TX ('The 4th Annual Longhorn Jazz Festival', with B.B King, Hugh Masekela Quintet, Young-Holt Unlimited, Miles Davis Quintet, Nina Simone. Blood, Sweat and Tears replaced Ten Years After)

July 26, 1969 Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, Queens, NY ('1969 Forest Hills Music Festival' with Johnny Winter)

July 27, 1969 Rutgers University Stadium, Piscataway Township, NJ ('First Annual Rutgers University Jazz Festival', with Donald Byrd, Miles Davis Quintet, Newport All-Stars with Red Norvo, Ruby Braff, George Wein, Ted Farlow, Don Lamond & Larry Ridley, Buddy Rich Orchestra & Nina Simone and quartet)

August 1, 1969 Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, CA (supported by Johnny Winter & Kaleidoscope) ​ August 2, 1969 Oakland Coliseum, Oakland, CA (supported by Love & Lee Michaels. Love were over an hour late and were told by the promoter that they couldn’t go on because the closing act, Blood, Sweat and Tears, had it in their contract that they would close the show. Jay Donnellan and George Suranovich of Love went and talked with the manager of BS&T and told him what had happened. BS&T’s manager said that there was no problem and if they want they can go on after BS&T. Donnellan and Suranovich went back and told Love’s leader Arthur Lee, but the latter was so hungry that he refused to play and went back to Los Angeles)

​August 9, 1969 Convention Hall, San Diego, CA

August 17, 1969 Max Yasgur’s Farm, Bethel, NY (Woodstock, Blood, Sweat and Tears come on at midnight (so actually played on August 18) and performed "More And More", "Just One Smile", "Something’s Coming On", "I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know", "Spinning Wheel", "Sometimes In Winter", "Smiling Phases", "God Bless The Child", "And When I Die" & "You’ve Made Me So Very Happy")

August 26, 1969 Blossom Music Center, Cuyahoga Falls, OH (with John Denver)

September 16, 1969 CBS 30th Street Studio, New York City, NY (The beginning of recording their third album, 'Blood, Sweat and Tears 3', produced by Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee. Most of the album was recorded this day, including the covers of The Rolling Stones' "Sympathy For The Devil" & Traffic's "40,000 Headmen")

September 20, 1969 NBC Studios Stage 4, Burbank, CA (US TV "The Andy Williams Show". performing "You Made Me So Very Happy". Also appearing were Petula Clark, Don Ho & The Edwin Hawkins Singers. This was the broadcast date)

October 2, 1969 ABC Television Center, Los Angeles, CA (US TV "This Is Tom Jones". performing "Spinning Wheel". Also appearing were Bobby Darin, Diahann Carroll & David Steinberg. This was the broadcast date)

October 4, 1969 Franklin & Marshall College Mayser Physical Education Gymnasium, Lancaster, PA

October 11, 1969 Cornell University Barton Hall, Ithaca, NY (supported by Don Cooper)

October 19, 1969 University of Detroit Memorial Building Auditorium, Detroit, MI ('Town & Gown')

October 23, 1969 Central Michigan University Finch Fieldhouse, Mount Pleasant, MI

​October 26, 1969 Auditorium Theatre, Chicago, IL

October 30, 1969 University Events Building, Ann Arbor, MI ('Homecoming '69')

October 31, 1969 University of Cincinnati Armory Fieldhouse, Cincinnati, OH

November 1, 1969 Jenison Fieldhouse, East Lansing, MI

November 18, 1969 Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, MO

November 21, 1969 Swing Auditorium, San Bernardino, CA

November 22, 1969 Convention Center, Anaheim, CA (supported by Tony Kosinec) ​ November 23, 1969 Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, CA (supported by Tony Kosinec) ​ November 30, 1969 Theater for the Performing Arts, Convention Centre Theatre, San Antonio, TX (supported by Tony Kosinec)

December 9, 1969 Auditorium Theatre, Chicago, Cook County, IL

December 19-21, 1969 Caesars Palace Auditorium, Las Vegas, NV (Blood, Sweat and Tears were the first rock band to play in a posh Las Vegas’ hotel and casino. Dave Victorson, the hotel’s entertainment director, signed the band for six shows in three nights. The shows were sold-out and the band was filling the 1,000-seat auditorium. The band also broke Frank Sinatra’s 20 year old house record. However, the successful Caesars Palace run was not that brilliant for their careers and credibility and they did receive a lot of criticism from the underground rock scene. The group was accused of being hollow and pretentious, swapping its original rock audience for older, cabaret-oriented listeners. They were called a lounge act and that they had sold their soul for the money. When they played at the Fillmore East a week later, they were derided for its Vegas appearance)

December 26-28, 1969 Fillmore East, New York City, NY (2 shows each night 8.00 & 11.30, Supported by Appaloosa & Allman Brothers)

1970

January 28, 1970 Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY ('Winter Festival For Peace', with Harry Belafonte, Dave Brubeck, Judy Collins, Richie Havens, The Cast of Hair, Jimi Hendrix and His Band Of Gypsies, Mother Earth, Peter, Paul & Mary, The Rascals)

​March 1, 1970 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

March 7, 1970 Dinner Key Auditorium, Miami, FL

March 8, 1970 Curtis Hixon Hall, Tampa, FL

March 21, 1970 Oracle Arena & Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, CA (with Sea Train)

April 2, 1970 New Haven Arena, New Haven, CT ​ ​April 4, 1970 Civic Center, Philadelphia, PA

April 10, 1970 Public Auditorium, Cleveland, OH

April 11, 1970 Cobo Arena, Detroit, MI (with Casey Anderson)

April 17, 1970 Boston Garden, Boston, MA ​ April 19, 1970 George V. Meehan Auditorium, Providence, RI (Afternoon Show) ​ April 26, 1970 Nashville Municipal Auditorium, Nashville, TN

June 13, 1970 Blood, Sweat and Tears left the US today on the first tour by a rock group to the Eastern European countries. The 26-day, 11-concert tour included Zagreb, Sarajevo and Ljubljana in Yugoslavia, Beograd in Serbia, Constanta, Bucharest and Ploiesti in Romania and Warsaw and Poznan in Poland. The concert in Ploiesti, was performed on behalf of the 'Romanian Flood Relief'. Blood, Sweat and Tears waived all fees for the tour, which was filmed by National General Television Productions for TV and possibly motion picture release that actually finally didn’t happen. The group traveled to Europe with their own equipment, especially designed to handle D.C. current. All accommodations and food was paid by the governments of the respective countries in local currency, with the State Department backing this in dollars.

June 18, 1970 Zagreb, YUG (Blood, Sweat and Tears’ European tour debut gig)

June 20, 1970 Stadion Tašmajdan, Beograd, SER (supported by Casey Anderson)

June or July 1970 Bucherest, ROM (The concert was followed by incidents between fans and the police, which ended with arrests)

July 17, 1970 Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, CA (supported by John Hartford, who replaced Gordon Lightfoot)

July 25, 1970 Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY (supported by Miles Davis Quintet)

September 7, 1970 Caesars Palace Auditorium, Las Vegas, NV (US TV "​The Ed Sullivan Show". Ed Sullivan devoted his entire show to the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) first annual "Entertainer of the Year Awards", that was taped on Labor Day at the Caesars Palace, Las Vegas. Sullivan introduced a video clip of Blood, Sweat and Tears performing 'Lucretia Mac Evil', and then their singer David Clayton-Thomas was welcomed onstage to accept a Georgie Award for "Best Musical Group", on the behalf of the entire band. The show was broadcasted on Sunday, September 20, on the CBS network)

September 19, 1970 Concertgbebouw, Amsterdam, NED (The show didn't start till past 2 in the morning and ended at well past 4, with a half hour version of "Somethin' Goin' On")

September 24-25, 1970 Royal Albert Hall, London, ENG

October 8, 1970 Convention Center, Anaheim, CA (with John Denver) ​ October 10, 1970 Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, CA (supported by More To Come (or Don Cooper)

October 16, 1970 Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, ON (supported by Mashmakan)

November 6, 1970 Civic Center, Charleston, WV

November 14, 1970 Public Auditorium, Cleveland, OH (Kent State Benefit Concert with, Neil Young & Glass Harp)

November 28, 1970 Convention Hall, Miami Beach, FL

December 4, 1970 Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, OH

December 5, 1970 Farm Show Arena, Harrisburg, PA

? ?, 1970 Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Winston-Salem, NC

? ?, 1970 Alexander Memorial Coliseum, Atlanta, GA

1971

Jerry Hyman left Blood, Sweat and Tears and was replaced by Dave Bargeron (b. David W. Bargeron, Sunday, September 6, 1942, Athol, Massachussets), formerly of Clark Terry, and Doc Severinsen. ​​ BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #5 (JANUARY 1971 - DECEMBER 31, 1971) 1) Steve Katz 2) Bobby Colomby 3) Jimmy Fielder 4) Freddie Lipsius 5) Dick Halligan 6) Chuck Winfield 7) Lew Soloff 8) David Clayton-Thomas 9) Dave Bargeron trombone, tuba, bass trombone, euphonium, sacqueboute

February 11, 1971 Festival Hall, Osaka, JPN ('Rock Carnival No.2 - The Essence of New Rock', supported by Thelma Houston) ​ February 13, 1971 Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, JPN ('Rock Carnival No.2 - The Essence of New Rock', supported by Thelma Houston)

February 17, 1970 Apollo Stadium, Adelaide, AUS (supported by Thelma Houston and Her Quartette)

February 18-19, 1970 Festival Hall, Melbourne, AUS (supported by Thelma Houston and Her Quartette)

February 20, 1970 Randwick Racecourse, Sydney, AUS (supported by Thelma Houston and Her Quartette)

February 21, 1970 Festival Hall, Brisbane, AUS (supported by Thelma Houston and Her Quartette)

March 1-3, 1971 Philarmonic Hall, New York City, NY (supported by Thelonious Monk)

​​March 25, 1971 Municipal Auditorium, Atlanta, GA

April 4, 1971 Sports Arena, Toledo, OH

April 14, 1971 Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN (supported by Charlie Starr. Rescheduled for April 30th)

April 30, 1971 Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN (supported by Charlie Starr. Originally scheduled for April 14th)

May 2, 1971 Civic Center, Lansing, MI ​ May 30, 1971 Civic Auditorium, San Jose, CA

July 2-3, 1971 Pirates World, Dania, FL (supported by Charlie Starr)

​July 23, 1971 Crisler Arena, Ann Arbor, MI

​July 26-August 1, 1971 Greek Theatre, Los Angeles, CA (with Thelma Houston)

September 17, 1971 St. John's University Alumni Hall, Queens, NY

​September 24, 1971 Cobo Arena, Detroit, MI (with Bill Withers)

September 25, 1971 Esalen Institute, Big Sur, CA ('8th Annual Big Sur Festival'. Free festival which also had on the bill: Joan Baez, Kris Kristofferson, Taj Mahal, Mimi Farina & Tom Jans, Lily Tomlin & Larry Manson, Mickey Newbury, Big Sur Choir)

October 8, 1971 Beard-Eaves-Memorial Coliseum, Auburn, AL

October 10, 1971 Hirsch Memorial Coliseum, Shreveport, LA

November 19, 1971 WNEW Studios, New York City, NY (US TV "The David Frost Show". Blood, Sweat and Tears were David's guests for the entire show. This was the broadcast date)

November 27, 1971 New Orleans, LA (Blood, Sweat and Tears performed their first concert with a full Symphony Orchestra) ​ ? ?, 1971 Stockholm, SWE (The show was filmed)

December 12, 1971 Academy of Music, Philadelphia, PA

December 16 & 18-19, 1971 Philarmonic Hall, New York City, NY (supported by Albert Brooks)

December 31, 1971 Convention Center, Anaheim, CA (supported by Charlie Starr. David Clayton-Thomas & Freddie Lipsius' last gig with Blood, Sweat and Tears)

1972

Blood, Sweat and Tears recruited blind singer/pianist Robert Glen 'Bobby' Doyle (b. Houston, Texas), who had done sessions for Poco, Swedish guitarist/vocalist Georg 'Jojje' Wadenius from Scandinavian band Made In Sweden, and tenor sax player Joseph 'Joe' Henderson.

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #6 (JANUARY 1972 - APRIL or MAY 1972) 1) Steve Katz 2) Jim Fielder 3) Dick Halligan 4) Bobby Colomby 5) Chuck Winfield 6) Lew Soloff 7) Dave Bargeron 8) Bobby Doyle lead vocals, piano 9) Jojje Wadenius vocals, guitar 10) Joe Henderson tenor sax ​ April or May 1972 The new lineup doesn't gel and Bobby Doyle and Joe Henderson were replaced by singer Jerry Fisher (b. Jerry Donald Fisher, Sunday, March 1, 1942, DeKalb, Texas), and sax player Louis Marini Jr., aka 'Blue Lou' (b. Charleston, North Carolina), formerly of Woody Herman, Joe Morello, and Doc Severinsen, while original member Dick Halligan also leaves to make way for keyboardist Larry Willis (b. Lawrence Elliott Willis, New York City, New York), a former student of the Manhattan School of Music who played with such people as Hugh Masekela, Cannonball Adderley, Queen Esther Marrow, and The Four Tops.

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #7 (APRIL or MAY 1972 - EARLY/MID MARCH 1973) 1) Steve Katz 2) Bobby Colomby 3) Jim Fielder 4) Lew Soloff 5) Dave Bargeron 6) Jojje Wadenius 7) Chuck Winfield 8) Louis Marini Jr. (aka 'Blue Lou') sax 9) Jerry Fisher lead vocals 10) Larry Willis keyboards

June 13-18, 1972 Paul's Mall, Boston, MA (supported by Don Cooper)

July 15, 1972 Montreux, SUI

July 16, 1972 Zurich, SUI ​ August 1, 1972 Temple University, Ambler, PA ('Temple University Music Festival', with Dave Brubeck, Pittsburgh Symphony, Carlos Montoya & Johnny Mathis)

August 19, 1972 Central Park Wollman Memorial Skating Rink, New York City, NY ('5th Annual The Schaefer Music Festival', supported by Chris Smither & Orphan)

August 20, 1972 Mount Morris Park, New York City, NY ('4th Annual Harlem Cultural Music Festival', hosted by Tony Lawrence)

September 3, 1972 Pine Knob Music Theatre, Clarkston, MI (supported by Don Cooper)

October 15-16, 1972 Philarmonic Hall, New York City, NY (supported by Robert Klein)

October 20, 1972 Cornell University Bailey Hall, Ithaca, NY (supported by Charlie Starr)

November 2, 1972 Hofstra University John Cranford Adams Playhouse, Hempstead, NY (US TV "In Concert", with Poco, Allman Brothers Band & Chuck Berry, performing "And When I Die" & "Snow Queen")

November 10, 1972 Garrison Gym, Warrensburg, MO

​​December ?, 1972 RMS Queen Mary Grand Ballroom, Long Beach, CA (US TV '1st Annual Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve', with Three Dog Night, Billy Preston, Al Green and His Soul Mates (with Mary Travers), and Helen Reddy. Hosted by Dick Clark, Blood, Sweat and Tears performed "I Can't Move No Mountains" & "You've Made Me So Very Happy", in front of some 500 invited guests)

December 16, 1972 Westbury Music Fair, Westbury, NY​ (supported by Ellen McIlwaine)

​December 31, 1972 John Scher’s Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ (2 shows 7.30 & 11.00, with B.B. King) ​ 1973

January 11, 1973 Bayfront Center Theatre, St. Petersburg, FL (supported by Don Cooper)

January 20, 1973 North Mesquite High School, Dallas, TX (Benefit with proceeds going to relief efforts for the Managua, Nicaragua earthquake of December 1972. This performance was recorded for the very first broadcast of the King Biscuit Flower Hour)

February 4, 1973 Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN

February 23, 1973 NBC Studios, Burbank, CA (US TV "The Midnight Special" performing "Rosemary", "Hip Pickels" & "Snow Queen". Also appearing were Harry Chapin, Skeeter Davis, Sam Neely, Kerrie Biddell, The Committee, The Hollies, The Association, Curtis Mayfield & Timmy Thomas. (broadcast date)

February 23, 1973 Marcus Center For The Performing Arts, Uihlein Hall, Milwaukee, WI (supported by David Bromberg)

February 25, 1973 Central Michigan University Finch Fieldhouse, Mount Pleasant, MI (supported by Home Cooking)

March 2, 1973 Berkeley Community Theatre, Berkeley, CA (supported by Bruce Springsteen)

March 3, 1973 Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, CA (supported by Bruce Springsteen)

March 4-6, 1973 Tulagi, Boulder, CO

March 11, 1973 Civic Center, Springfield, MA

March 16, 1973 Houston, TX

March 17, 1973 Dallas, TX

March 18, 1973 Waco, TX

March ?, 1973 Florida (Steve Katz & Chuck Winfield's last gig with Blood, Sweat and Tears. Winfield was replaced by Tom Malone)

BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS #8 (MARCH ??, 1973 - AUGUST 1973)

  • Bobby Colomby
  • Jim Fielder
  • Lew Soloff
  • Dave Bargeron
  • Jojje Wadenius
  • Louis Marini Jr.
  • Jerry Fisher
  • Larry Willis
  • Tom 'Bones' Malone - second trumpet, flugelhorn, tenor trombone, tenor sax, flute, alto flute, Fender bass

March 24, 1973 Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, Baltimore, MD

March 25, 1973 Academy Of Music, Philadelphia, PA (supported by Hall & Oates)

April 4, 1973 Wilmington, NC

April 5, 1973 Fayeteville, NC

April 6, 1973 Spartanburg, SC

April 7, 1973 Asheville, NC

April 8, 1973 New Orleans, LA

April 27-28, 1973 Ohio University Convocation Center, Athens, OH ('The Ohio University Music Festival', with Bruce Springsteen, The Eagles, Billy Preston, Joe Walsh, Dr. Hook And The Medicine Show, Jo Jo Gunne, Jonathan Edwards, M.C. Uncle Dirty. Lighting by Harris. Sound by Clair)

May 1, 1973 Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, CA

May 25, 1973 Circus Krone, Munich, GER

November 8, 1973 Pamplin Sports Center, Lewis & Clark College, Portland, OR (supported by Sonoma)

May 16, 1974 Messehalle, Sindelfingen, GER

June 10, 1974 Apollo, Glasgow, SCOT

July 19, 1975 Washington Park, Homewood, IL (supporting Roberta Flack) ​

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.